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How To Boil Sea Moss To Make Sea Moss Gel

by Capri Lilly

Want to learn how to boil sea moss to make sea moss gel? Here we will share how to make sea moss gel using the boiling method. We even take it a step further and show you how to enhance your sea moss gel with superfoods like Bladderwrack and Spirulina! 

Here at GFB, we are passionate about all things healthy and superfoods! You can learn more about the cold method to make sea moss and sea moss benefits with this post: How To Make Sea Moss Gel + Sea Moss Benefits. If you’re interested in learning what to do with your sea moss gel, you’ll definitely want to check out our 5 Way To Use Sea Moss Gel, Elderberry Ginger Infused Sea Moss, or Sea Moss Gummies!

Before jumping to the recipe please note that the below information contains HOT TIPS for this recipe. We try to answer all your questions to guarantee you make the recipe perfect every time.

boiling irish sea moss

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There are several ways to make sea moss gel. Once dried sea moss soaks in water and expands, it can be blended with water or boiled in water to make sea moss gel. The boiling method is the traditional Caribbean way to make sea moss gel (many people have told me this is the method they used growing up in the 80s and 90s). Both methods are simple, and the result is sea moss gel to enjoy daily in smoothies, juices, soups, sauces, or on its own!

boiled sea moss in a saucepan
Boiled Sea Moss Turned Into Sea Moss Gel

When I was first introduced to sea moss and how to make sea moss gel, I was shown the cold method and it is my preferred way to make seamoss gel. Since then, I’ve also learned the boil method and have tried it several times. 

The goal of this post, and my entire site, is to share information and techniques with you so that you are equipped with what you need to make your own decisions (and tasty recipes!). If you prefer to boil your sea moss, this post is a guide to ensure you do so efficiently and maintain its nutritional value as much as possible. 

Spirulina Infused Sea Moss Gel With Bladderwrack in a mason jar
Spirulina Infused Sea Moss Gel With Bladderwrack

Should You Boil Sea Moss?

There is a lot of discrepancy regarding the effectiveness of boiled sea moss. While the boiling method is a more “traditional way” of making sea moss gel, many believe exposing the raw sea moss to high temperatures for an extensive amount of time reduces its benefits. Alternatively, some say that sea moss can withstand high heat and acids (like from lemon).

irish moss in a bowl with water and lime
Raw Sea Moss In Water With Lime (preparing for soaking)

Thanks to the almost 500,00 views on my How To Make Fruit Infused Sea Moss, How To Prepare Sea Moss + Make Sea Moss Gel, and 5 Way To Use Sea Moss youtube videos, I’ve received lots of comments that have led to interesting discussions. Some say that sea moss gel retains its nutrients even when boiled. Many people swear by boiling sea moss, while others say the cold method is best.

Whichever method you decide, let’s make sure you do it the correct way. There is no need to boil sea moss for hours on end, put it in a slow cooker overnight, or pressure cook it. Done properly, boiling sea moss to make sea moss gel is easy and only takes about 15 minutes longer than the cold soak method.

sea moss expanded in a bowl with lime and alkaline water
Sea Moss Expanded After Soaking For 12 Hours

If you are unfamiliar with sea moss, you can learn more about it in my Sea Moss Benefits post. Sea moss is packed with vitamins and minerals, is low in calories and sugar, and provides a small amount of plant-based protein. It is vegan, naturally gluten-free, and alkaline. The alga possesses an incredibly impressive nutrient profile and has numerous health benefits. To learn more about the nutritional values of sea moss gel, check out this list compiled by the USDA Food Data Central.

Here Are The Ingredients You Need To Make Sea Moss Gel

  • Raw Sea Moss: Whether you are using Chondrus crispus—red algae commonly called Irish moss or carrageen moss, Genus Gracilaria, or Eucheuma Cottonii, make sure you get it from a reputable source. (We get our sea moss from Donata Skinfood)
  • Water: Make sure to use spring or alkaline water. If possible, try to avoid using tap water as it can potentially contain contaminants such as chlorine, heavy metals, pesticides, etc. (Check out the EWG Website to learn about the tap water quality near you.)
  • Lime, optional: Soaking your sea moss with lime helps to reduce the seaweed taste.

Optional Superfood To Add-in:

Spirulina Infused Irish Sea Moss Gel With Bladderwrack

sea moss infused with spirulina and bladderwrack in a jar
Sea Moss Gel Infused With Spirulina and Bladderwrack

Common Questions:

How Long To Soak Your Sea Moss?

Do you soak sea moss in hot or cold water?

Soak the sea moss in room temperature water. Alkaline or spring water is best. Avoid using tap water as it can potentially contain contaminants.

Do you refrigerate sea moss when soaking?

No, you do not have to refrigerate the sea moss when soaking. What is most important is that the water is covering all of the sea moss and the container or bowl is covered with a lid or plastic wrap.

sea moss soaking in alkaline water
Sea moss soaked in alkaline water

What happens if you soak sea moss too long?

If you soak sea moss for too long, especially at room temperature, the quality of the sea moss diminishes and the sea moss can quickly spoil. Do not soak your sea moss for more than 48 hours.

I’ve done numerous experiments to determine how long soaked sea moss can last. When left on the counter for 3 days+ the sea moss became visibly moldy. When left soaked in a mason jar on the counter for 1 week, the sea moss spoiled. I opened the jar and the smell was rancid, extremely fishy, and unbearable.

Many people mentioned, “it is a live organism and needs air, therefore you should leave it open to the air to breathe”, “cover it with a cheesecloth and allow it to breath”, and things along this line. I want to clarify here that Soaked Sea Moss and Sea moss gel is perishable. Sea Moss gel needs to be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Do not store sea moss gel in pantries or room-temperature areas; it will go bad. Only raw dried sea moss can be stored at room temperature in a sealed bag. 

steps to show how to boil sea moss

How To Boil Sea Moss To Make Sea Moss Gel? (Stove Top Method)

  1. Place the dried sea moss in a large bowl, cover it with water, and massage the sea moss. Be sure to remove any visible dirt and debris. Drain and repeat this step once more.
  2. Place the sea moss in a large bowl and cover it with filtered or spring water. (do not use tap water) Make sure all the parts of the sea moss are covered. Allow the sea moss to soak for 12-24 hours. (at room temperature)
  3. Boiling The Sea Moss (2 Ways):
    1. Drain the sea moss from the water. Then, add the sea moss to a medium-sized saucepan and then add water until the water is about a half inch over the sea moss. Bring the saucepan to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer. Continuously stir the sea moss for 10-15 minutes, or until the sea moss fully breaks down (some small clumps are okay). Optional: Remove the sea moss from the heat. Stir in spirulina powder and bladderwrack. Mix until fully combined.
    2. Drain the sea moss from the water. Transfer the soaked sea moss to a medium saucepan filled with water. Bring it to a low boil over medium heat, then reduce to a simmer for 10-15 minutes or until soft. Remove it from the heat and strain the water, reserving the water for blending. Transfer the sea moss to a heat-safe blender then add water until the water is about a half inch over the sea moss (or more depending on your desired consistency). Blend the sea moss until smooth. (Make sure to allow the steam to escape from the top to avoid injury) Optional: Add in spirulina powder and bladderwrack. Blend once more until fully combined.
  4. Transfer the Sea Moss gel into a mason jar. Allow the gel to cool at room temperature for at least 30 minutes. Then, seal the jar and transfer it to the fridge. Store in the refrigerator for up to 2-4 weeks or in the freezer for up to 3 months. 
  5. Enjoy 1-2 tablespoons a day in smoothies, tea, coffee, soups, jams, etc.

Tips:

  • If the water you soaked the sea moss in is relatively clear of visible dirt and debris, feel free to use it to make the sea moss gel.
  • Remember, raw sea moss expands to 4 times its size. When making the gel, start with enough water to just cover the sea moss, or 1 cup, then increase the amount of water as desired.
  • The more water you use, the thinner the consistency the gel will be. Use more or less water to reach your desired consistency. Remember, the gel will thicken in the fridge.
  • As you simmer and stir the sea moss, it will break down and turn into a gel. If you want the consistency to be smoother, you can place the boiled sea moss into a heat-safe blender and blend until smooth. (The first method is great if you do not have a blender.)
  • Allow your gel to cool before placing it in the fridge.
boiled sea moss in a saucepan infused with spirulina and bladderwrack

What Happens If You Boil Sea Moss?

When you boil (previously soaked) raw sea moss it becomes softer and breaks down easily. If you use a whisk you can stir the sea moss and it will break down further and begin to form a gel. Alternatively, you can let the boiled sea moss cool slightly, transfer it into a blender, and blend until smooth.

How Long Do You Boil Sea Moss For?

First, you bring your sea moss to a boil. Then reduce the heat and allow it to simmer for 15-20 minutes. Do not boil your sea moss for more than 30 minutes.

Do You Need To Boil Seamoss?

You do not need to boil your sea moss. You can use the cold method, which involves soaking the sea moss in water for 12-24 hours, then blending it with water until smooth.

If you want to know how to make sea moss gel without boiling, refer to my post How to make sea moss gel to learn the cold blender method.

jar of sea moss infused with spirulina and bladderwrack with a small dish of spirulina powder and bladderwrack in the background

How much sea moss to take daily?

The recommended amount of sea moss gel to take daily is 1-2 tablespoons. If you are new to use sea moss gel, begin with 1 tsp and see how your body feels. Work your way up to 1-2 tablespoons if you desire more.

What are the side effects of sea moss?

Sea moss is high in iodine, with researchers estimating that it contains about 47 milligrams of iodine per gram. Iodine is an essential mineral that the human body needs but does not produce and must be consumed from the foods we eat or supplements. Too much iodine can cause health complications. It is important to consume sea moss in moderation, typically no more than 1 or 2 tablespoons a day, or 4 grams per day (according to research!).

Also, be mindful of where the sea moss is grown. Like many seaweeds, sea moss can contain heavy metals like mercury, arsenic, and lead. While researchers say that the amount based on consumption of 4 grams a day does not raise serious health concerns, consuming sea moss in moderation is important.

close up of spirulina infused sea moss gel on a gold spoon

How to use sea moss gel?

Sea moss gel can be used in a number of ways. An easy way is to add it to your juices and smoothies. You can also use it as a thickening agent and use it to thicken soups and stews. Try adding it to your favorite dishes to give them more of a nutrient boost. Remember, the flavor of sea moss is masked when added to foods and drinks. In my cookbook, Cooking With Sea Moss, I share over 50 plant-based recipes that contain sea moss —all are absolutely delicious and easy to make!

I hope you enjoy this guide on how to boil sea moss!

If you try the recipe, don’t forget to rate the recipe and let me know what you think in the comments below! Take pictures, tag #goodfoodbaddie, and share them with me on Instagram and Pinterest! I love seeing my recipes come to life in your kitchen.

More Irish Sea Moss Gel Recipes!

boiling irish sea moss

How To Boil Sea Moss To Make Sea Moss Gel

Want to learn how to boil sea moss to make sea moss gel? Here we will share how to make sea moss gel using the boiling method. We even take it a step further and show you how to enhance your sea moss gel with superfoods like Bladderwrack and Spirulina! 
5 from 15 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Snack
Cuisine: Alkaline, Healthy Options, Vegan
Prep Time: 30 minutes
12 hours
Total Time: 12 hours 30 minutes
Servings: 20 tbsp
Calories: 11kcal
Author: Capri Lilly

Ingredients

  • 1 oz  Dried Raw Irish Sea Moss (about 29 grams when weighed)
  • Spring or Alkaline water for cleaning and soaking

Optional Add-ins

  • 1 tbsp Bladderwrack Powder
  • 2 tbsp Spirulina Powder

Instructions

Prepare and Wash Sea Moss

  • Place the dried sea moss in a large bowl, cover it with water, and massage the sea moss. Be sure to remove any visible dirt and debris. Drain and repeat this step once more.
  • Place the sea moss in a large bowl and cover it with filtered or spring water. (do not use tap water) Make sure all the parts of the sea moss are covered. Allow the sea moss to soak for 12-24 hours. (at room temperature)

Boiling The Sea Moss (2 Ways):

  • Drain the sea moss from the water. Then, add the sea moss to a medium sized saucepan and then add water until the water is about an half inch over the sea moss. 
  • Bring the saucepan to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer. Continously stir the sea moss for 10-15 minutes, or until the sea moss fully breaks down (some small clumps are okay). 
  • Optional: Remove the sea moss from the heat. Stir in spirulina powder and bladderwrack. Mix until fully combined.

Second Method:

  • Drain the sea moss from the water. Transfer the soaked sea moss to a medium saucepan filled with water. Bring it to a low boil over medium heat, then reduce to a simmer for 10-15 minutes or until soft. 
  • Remove the sea moss from the heat and strain the water and reserve it for blending. Transfer the sea moss to a heat-safe blender then add water until the water is about an half inch over the sea moss (or more depending on your desired consistency).
  • Blend the sea moss until smooth. Add water and blend to reach your desired consistency. (Make sure to allow the steam to escape from the top and use a heat tolerant blender to avoid injury)
  • Optional: Add in spirulina powder and bladderwrack. Blend once more until fully combined.

Storing The Sea Moss Gel

  • Transfer the Sea Moss gel into a mason jar. Allow the gel to cool at room temperature for at least 30 minutes. Then, seal the jar and transfer it to the fridge. Store in the refrigerator for up to 2-4 weeks or in the freezer for up to 3 month
  • Enjoy 1-2 tablespoons a day in smoothies, tea, coffee, soups, jams, etc.

Nutrition

Serving: 1tbsp | Calories: 11kcal

Please refer to my Nutrition Disclaimer Here.

Sources:

  • Andersen S, et al. (2019). Iodine in edible seaweed, its absorption, dietary use, and relation to iodine nutrition in Arctic people.
    pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30990756/
  • Darias-Rosales J, Rubio C, Gutiérrez ÁJ, Paz S, Hardisson A. Risk assessment of iodine intake from the consumption of red seaweeds (Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus). Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2020 Dec;27(36):45737-45741. doi: 10.1007/s11356-020-10478-9. Epub 2020 Aug 15. PMID: 32803579. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32803579/
  • Zava TT, Zava DT. Assessment of Japanese iodine intake based on seaweed consumption in Japan: A literature-based analysis. Thyroid Res. 2011 Oct 5;4:14. doi: 10.1186/1756-6614-4-14. PMID: 21975053; PMCID: PMC3204293.
  • Rubio C, Napoleone G, Luis-González G, Gutiérrez AJ, González-Weller D, Hardisson A, Revert C. Metals in edible seaweed. Chemosphere. 2017 Apr;173:572-579. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.01.064. Epub 2017 Jan 12. PMID: 28152409. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28152409/

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