Learn how to cook duck eggs three ways so you can enjoy this super nutritious food anytime you want! With this comprehensive guide, you’ll learn everything you need to know about duck eggs, including the difference between duck eggs and chicken eggs, their nutritional value, and where to purchase them.

Once you learn all about duck eggs, use them to make other egg recipes like our Breakfast Egg Muffins, Short Rib Hash and Eggs, and this Spinach Artichoke Frittata recipe.

scrambled duck eggs on toast with sliced tomatoes on a white plate

Fresh duck eggs are the best! When most people think of eggs, they automatically think of chicken eggs but these are bigger and better. How exactly? Once you learn how to cook duck eggs you’ll use them for everything!

Why You’ll Love These Duck Eggs Recipes

  • Amazing Flavor! Duck eggs are richer, creamier, and even more satisfying than regular eggs.
  • Great Chicken Egg Substitute! If you’re allergic to chicken eggs, there’s a chance that you can still enjoy duck eggs. (Just check with your doctor first.)
  • Healthy! They are packed with protein and nutrients, making them an excellent way to start your day.
a container full of duck eggs
A half carton of duck eggs
a hand holding a duck egg

Duck Eggs vs Chicken Eggs

Ducks eggs are immediately compared to chicken eggs so let’s go over the key differences.

APPEARANCE. They are larger than chicken eggs and the shell is thicker. Although this makes them a bit tougher to crack, they also have a longer shelf life than regular eggs.

The color of duck egg shells varies just like regular eggs. So they can be gray, brown, white, or even green. The yolk is bigger (nearly twice the size) and the white portion is stickier and less runny than a chicken egg.

a duck egg and a chicken egg side by side
Duck Egg vs Large Chicken Egg
a duck egg and a chicken egg side by side
Duck Egg vs Large Chicken Egg

TASTE. The taste profile is similar but duck eggs have a deeper egg flavor. The yolk is creamier and the flavor is richer.

NUTRITION. Because they are bigger, they have more calories, fat, protein, and cholesterol per serving. They also have a higher concentration of omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin A, and vitamin B12.

close up view of scrambled duck eggs on toast with a side of sliced tomatoes

Where to Find Duck Eggs

They aren’t as easy to buy as regular eggs. But you can find them at farmers’ markets and specialty stores like Whole Foods.

Because they are harder to come by, they tend to be more expensive. They can cost 2-3 times more than other eggs; the most expensive being $12 per dozen. However, you’ll usually find high-quality duck eggs.

3 Ways to Make Duck Eggs

How do you take your eggs? Here are three methods showing how to cook duck eggs. Check out the ingredients in the recipe card!

Scrambled Duck Eggs

  1. CRACK, SEASON & WHISK. In a medium bowl, crack the eggs and season with salt and pepper, then add minced garlic (optional). Whisk the mixture until it becomes smooth and well combined, ensuring there are no traces of egg white streaks left.
  2. COOK OVER MEDIUM HEAT. Lightly coat a small nonstick skillet with olive oil or butter over medium heat. Once the pan is heated, pour in the beaten eggs and let them sit for a few seconds without stirring. Use a rubber spatula to gently move across the pan’s bottom, creating large, soft curds of scrambled eggs.
  3. LOWER HEAT & FOLD. Maintain the heat at medium-low and continue cooking by folding and stirring the eggs every few seconds. Make sure to scrape the spatula along the bottom and sides of the pan regularly to encourage the formation of more curds and to prevent any part of the eggs from becoming dry.
  4. REMOVE FROM HEAT & GARNISH. When the scrambled eggs are mostly set but still have a bit of liquid egg remaining, take the pan off the heat. Garnish with chopped fresh chives for extra flavor and presentation. Enjoy your duck scrambled eggs!
6 step visual showing how to cook scrambled duck eggs

Over Easy Duck Eggs

ADD EGGS TO A HOT FRYING PAN. In a non-stick skillet over medium-low heat, melt butter. Once the butter has melted, crack 1 or 2 eggs into the pan. Season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

a duck egg frying in a pan

FLIP. Let the egg cook for 2 minutes. You want the egg whites to be firm, but the yolk is still runny. Then use a spatula to gently flip the eggs and cook for 30 seconds.

plated over easy duck eggs with a fork beside it

SERVE. Gently slide the eggs out of the pan and place them on toast or a plate. The yolk should runny with fully cooked egg whites.

over easy duck egg on toast with avocado on the side on a white plate

Soft Boiled Duck Eggs

  1. BOIL WATER. Start by bringing a pot of water to a boil. It’s best to use a medium-sized pot with enough water to cover the eggs by about an inch. While you wait for the water to boil, take the eggs out of the fridge and place them on the counter.
  2. LOWER TO SIMMER & ADD EGGS. After the water reaches a boiling point, lower the heat to a gentle simmer (with no bubbles). Carefully use a spoon (or skimmer) to slowly and gently add the eggs to the water. Once they are in, turn the heat back up to bring the water back to a boil.
close up view of a sliced and seasoned soft boiled duck egg

SET A TIMER. Cook the eggs for 6 to 7 minutes for soft-boiled eggs and 9 to 12 minutes for hard-boiled eggs. While the eggs are cooking, prepare an ice-water bath.

ICE BATH. Once the eggs have cooked to your preferred time, use a spoon to remove them and immediately submerge them in the ice-water bath to stop their cooking.

PEEL, SEASON & SERVE. Carefully peel the eggs. Then slice, season with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!

two soft boiled eggs on a plate with one sliced open to reveal a golden, jammy center

Tips for Duck Egg Recipes

  • Since duck egg yolks are larger, they may take longer to cook than chicken eggs.
  • When using these in place of chicken eggs, account for the size difference. For example, a standard omelet for two may take four eggs but you won’t need more than three if you’re using duck eggs.
  • Don’t feel limited to breakfast. Use these for sweet treats too! Because they are higher in fat and protein, they are great for baking cakes that require a light, fluffy texture.

FAQs

Are duck eggs safe to eat?

Yes! They have the same USDA regulations as chicken eggs so they are just as safe for consumption.

Do duck eggs taste different?

They taste very similar to regular eggs, just richer and creamier.

Are duck eggs good for you?

They are a healthy addition to a well-balanced diet.

Why are duck eggs not sold in stores?

They aren’t in demand like chicken eggs so you won’t find them at standard grocery stores. You can often find them at your local Farmer’s Market or specialty store.

over easy duck eggs on toast with a side of sliced avocado

I Hope You Enjoy This Duck Egg Guide!

If you try these recipes and learn how to cook duck eggs, don’t forget to rate them and let me know what you think in the comments. Leave a quick review & star rating ★ below! Take pictures, tag #goodfoodbaddie, and share them with me on InstagramFacebook, and Pinterest! I love seeing my recipes come to life in your kitchen.

More Egg Recipes To Try!

scrambled duck eggs on toast with sliced tomatoes

How To Cook Duck Eggs

Learn how to cook duck eggs three ways so you can enjoy this super nutritious food anytime you want. With this comprehensive guide, you'll learn everything you need to know about duck eggs, including the difference between duck eggs and chicken eggs, their nutritional value, and where to purchase them.
5 from 9 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Gluten-Free, Healthy Options
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Servings: 1
Calories: 130kcal
Author: Capri Lilly

Ingredients

Scrambled Duck Eggs:

  • 2 Duck Eggs
  • 1 tbsp Butter or Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 Garlic clove minced

Over Easy Duck Eggs:

  • 1 Egg
  • ½ tbsp Butter
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Soft Boiled Duck Eggs:

  • 2 Eggs
  • Water

Instructions

How To Make Scrambled Duck Eggs:

  • In a medium bowl, crack the eggs and season with salt and pepper, then add minced garlic (optional). Whisk the mixture until it becomes smooth and well combined, ensuring there are no traces of egg white streaks left.
  • Lightly coat a small nonstick skillet with olive oil or melt the butter in it over medium heat. Once the pan is heated, pour in the beaten eggs and let them sit for a few seconds without stirring. Use a rubber spatula to gently move across the pan's bottom, creating large, soft curds of scrambled eggs.
  • Maintain the heat at medium-low and continue cooking by folding and stirring the eggs every few seconds. Make sure to scrape the spatula along the bottom and sides of the pan regularly to encourage the formation of more curds and to prevent any part of the eggs from becoming dry.
  • When the scrambled eggs are mostly set but still have a bit of liquid egg remaining, take the pan off the heat. Garnish of chopped fresh chives for extra flavor and presentation. Enjoy your duck scrambled eggs!

How To Make Over Easy Duck Eggs

  • In a non-stick skillet over medium-low heat, melt butter.
  • Once the butter has melted, crack 1 or 2 eggs into the pan. Season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  • Let the egg cook for 2 minutes. You want the egg whites to be firm, but the yolk is still runny.
  • Use a spatula to gently flip the eggs and cook for 30 seconds.
  • Gently slide the eggs out of the pan and place them on toast or a plate. The yolk should runny with fully cooked egg whites.

How To Make Soft Boiled Duck Eggs:

  • Start by bringing a pot of water to a boil. It's best to use a medium-sized pot with enough water to cover the eggs by about an inch. While you wait for the water to boil, take the eggs out of the fridge and place them on the counter.
  • After the water reaches a boiling point, lower the heat to a gentle simmer (with no bubbles). Carefully use a spoon (or skimmer) to slowly and gently add the eggs to the water. Once they are in, turn the heat back up to bring the water back to a boil.
  • Set a timer and cook the eggs for 6 to 7 minutes for soft-boiled eggs and 9 to 12 minutes for hard-boiled eggs. While the eggs are cooking, prepare an ice-water bath.
  • Once the eggs have cooked to your preferred time, use a spoon to remove the duck eggs and immediately submerge them in the ice-water bath to stop their cooking.
  • Carefully peel the eggs. Then slice, season with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!

Notes

goodfoodbaddie.com offers nutritional information for recipes contained on this site. This information is provided as a courtesy and is an estimate only. To obtain the most accurate representation of the nutritional information in any given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients you used to make the recipe. For more information read our Nutritional Disclaimer.

Nutrition

Serving: 1duck egg | Calories: 130kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 9g | Fat: 9.6g | Saturated Fat: 2.6g | Cholesterol: 619mg | Sodium: 102mg | Potassium: 155mg | Sugar: 0.7g | Calcium: 45mg | Iron: 3mg
nutrition facts for 1 duck egg

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4 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I found duck at my local Latin market and wanted to give them a try. I followed your instructions and made them scrambled and it turned out perfect!!! Thanks for this helpful guide!

  2. 5 stars
    Loved this! I tried the scrambled duck eggs for the first time a couple months ago and it was very delightful. I would recommend scrambled this way from now on.

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